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Making Salted Duck Eggs / Century Eggs

 
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wizi
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Joined: 22 Sep 2005
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Location: Nairobi

PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2005 5:54 pm    Post subject: Making Salted Duck Eggs / Century Eggs Reply with quote

We get fresh duck eggs here (Nairobi), and I am wondering if I can make century eggs from scratch? Does anyone know? Thx

I've already made salted duck eggs and they tasted quite good, but the yolks were not orangey.. due to the duck feed..


Last edited by wizi on Fri Sep 30, 2005 4:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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small cookie
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Joined: 22 Jul 2004
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Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2005 8:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Century Eggs Reply with quote

wizi wrote:
We get fresh duck eggs here (Nairobi), and I am wondering if I can make century eggs from scratch? Does anyone know? Thx

I've already made salted duck eggs and they tasted quite good, but the yolks were not orangey.. due to the duck feed..


wow, homemade salted eggs!!!
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Gina
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Joined: 20 Jul 2004
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2005 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wizi

my late granny used to make century eggs. I remember as a child watching her covering the duck eggs with rice husks, mud and leaving it in a earthern pot and cover it. She would leave it there covered, in a corner in the kitchen for months.

I don't have actual recipe of how to and what to do. All I can remember is mud and water and briefly wrapped the egg with it..let it dry in the hot sun and storing it.
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Alannia
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Joined: 08 Jul 2005
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Location: Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2005 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wizi, how do you make your own salted eggs?
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wizi
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Joined: 22 Sep 2005
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Location: Nairobi

PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I missed this thread until now... Embarassed

Gina, I read in a Maxine Hong Kingston book once that duck eggs were buried by the peasants in Guangzhou in the midst of war, right in the farmland where manure and mud reign. Then when the famine was rife, the peasants dug up the stash and found the eggs had fermented into a delicious cotion known as century eggs - since they've forgotten how long ago they'd buried them!

I saw in Thailand they have very cleaned and pinked stained century duck eggs. I am certain they have found a modern convenient way to produce them but guess it's still a trade secret.

Alannia, I made salted duck eggs like this. Find an airtight glass container that can contain around 4-6 duck eggs. Sterilize the container.

Using the amount of water that would fit into the glass container, I melted as much salt as I possibly could in the water with slow heat. When no more salt can be melted any further - you know this because you start seeing the salt re-crystallising in the bottom of your pot. - turn off fire and let the salt mixture cool. Then carefully pour the salt mixture into your sterilized glass container over the duck eggs, ensure that there is overflow then seal it shut air-tight. Make sure there is no air pocket else the eggs will rot due to contact with air. The eggs will float up the container..

Keep the whole thing in the larder - some place cool and dark for around 2 to 3 weeks. After that, remove the eggs and boil them from cold water until hard boiled. 20 mins simmer? The salted duck eggs are now ready for consumption!
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Wizi, I made my own salted eggs too using the same method. However, I do not boil all at one-go. I removed them from the salt water and keep them in the fridge. I found that as time passes, the egg yolk becomes less orangey and sometime the egg white becomes watery.

Do you boil all eggs at one go and them store them in the fridge or else how do you store the unboiled salty eggs, can share ?

TIA

ps: I'm doing a batch using another recipe, added wine to the salt water. will share the recipe if it turns out good next month.

jc
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Alannia
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Wizi. Will try and find fresh duck eggs here.
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wizi
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Joined: 22 Sep 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alannia, you must find duck eggs that are as fresh as possible! A measure for the brine solution : For every 2 gallons of water, you will need 1 lb of salt.

Jc, I do boil all the brined duck eggs at one go. I am not sure if it's hygenic to keep unboiled brine eggs in the fridge and boil them whenever you need them...

One thing though, some people like to have tender whites and yolks in their duck eggs. If you prefer that as well, then you can just bring your eggs to a boil over high heat, as soon as the water boils, remove the pot from the heat and let stand 12 minutes for large eggs. Medium eggs should sit a minute less. Drain the eggs and cool them down faster by covering them in cold water.

There was a filipino website (I don't have the link anymore) which even recommended that you shake the pan vigorously to crack the shells to let them cool faster and prevent overcooking. They recommend that if you don't eat them immediately, store them in a bowl in the fridge, covered with water. This method which they called 'hard cooking' (as opposed to 'hard boiling') gives tender whites and fully cooked yolks.

Happy duck egging!
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to share the salty egg I made. It's too salty to my liking, still prefer my old method which mentioned by wizi above.


jc
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Alannia
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Wizi for the tips. Will certainly look out for fresh duck eggs. Not sure whether can find it here.
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wizi
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2005 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jc, what kind of wine and how much did you add to the brine? I guess maybe the wine penetrates the duck shells better and osmosis makes the egg saltier than normal??? island:
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2005 2:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Wizi, according to the recipe, should add 45g of rice wine to 1600ml water +400g salt. I do not have rice wine, I added yellow cooking wine.

jc
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wizi
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thx jc..! You know, your duck egg yolk is extremely orange! The duck egg yolks here in Nairobi are pale in color. I think it's because they feed them yellow corn here with no added carotene.
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